9 things trainees said about the Australasian College of Dermatologists training program

Thursday, 20 Feb 2020


Doctors in training with the Australasian College of Dermatologists (ACD) are less satisfied with their program than trainees in other specialities, according to results from Australia’s first-ever national medical training survey (MTS).

Responses from 31 doctors in training with the ACD were compared against results of all doctors in training on programs such as the RACP and RACP (n=9,378). Overall, the survey showed that 68% of dermatology trainees would recommend their current training position to other doctors (vs 78% of all doctors in training).

Other key findings from the survey are:

  • 80% of dermatology trainees rated their quality of clinical supervision as good or excellent (vs 84% of all doctors in training);
  • 83% believed the College training program is relevant to their development (vs 88% of all doctors in training);
  • 84% said there was a range of opportunities to develop their clinical skills (vs 89% of all doctors in training) but only 69% said there were opportunities to develop procedural skills (vs 77% of all doctors in training);
  • 56% said they had access to protected study time/leave (vs 63% of all doctors in training);
  • 82% of dermatology trainees said most senior medical staff were supportive (vs 91% of all doctors in training);
  • 59% said their workplace supported staff wellbeing (vs 75% nationally) and supported them to achieve a good work/life balance (vs 64% of all doctors in training);
  • 64% said bullying, harassment and discrimination (including racism) was not tolerated at their (vs 75% of all doctors in training);
  • 27% said they had experienced bullying, harassment and/or discrimination, of whom 35% reported it and 52% of these reports were followed up;
  • On average, ACD trainees worked 46.3 hours per week (vs 46.9 hours of all doctors in training) but only 38% said they always or mostly got for the unrostered overtime (vs 47% of all doctors in training);

Medical Board of Australia Chair Dr Anne Tonkin said the survey results provide an evidence base that educators, employers and stakeholders across the health sector can use to improve the culture of medicine and further strengthen medical training.

‘The 2019 survey results tell the start of an important and emerging national story about the culture and quality of medical training, from trainees’ perspectives. We hope the results trigger ideas and discussion about what we can all do to keep improving it,’ she said.

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