Psoriatic arthritis

Study suggests role for interleukin-17A in PsA


The results of a Phase III study suggest an important role for interleukin-17A in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis, investigators of an industry sponsored trial say.

Published in the NEJM the randomised study of 606 patients with psoriatic arthritis found the anti–interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody secukinumab was better than placebo in improving the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis.

ACR20 response rates at week 24 were significantly higher in the group receiving secukinumab at doses of 150 mg (50.0%) and 75 mg (50.5%) than in those receiving placebo (17.3%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo).

Four strokes and two MIs occurred in the treatment group and infections, including candida, were also more common.

“Longer and larger studies will be required to assess uncommon serious adverse effects and adverse effects associated with longterm use of secukinumab,” the study authors including Peter Nash from the University of Queensland in Brisbane said.

“These results suggest an important role for interleukin-17A in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and validate inhibition of this cytokine as a therapeutic approach in this disease,” they concluded.

The study was funded by Novartis Pharma.

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